Archive for the 'Videos' category

Tomato Cage Tip – Safer | Easier Storage Video

Nov 05 2018 Published by under Agricultural Age, Fall, The Ages, The Seasons, Videos


Tomato Cages Can Be Difficult and Dangerous to Store – Until Now!

Tomato cages are easy to forget about when they are filled with lovely, ripe tomatoes.  But when the growing season is over, dealing with these wire monstrosities can be a hassle.  Fed up with being cut, poked, and annoyed by these cages, I found a way to make them safer and much more efficient to store.

How Do you Store Your Tomato Cages?

Have you struggled with the same issues when it comes time to store your tomato cages?  How did you conquer the beast?  Share your wisdom and leave a comment below!

Video Transcript

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Do Siberian Huskies Shed?


Siberian Husky Shedding Coat

Video Transcript

this is Roxy our a Siberian Husky Buck see hey Roxy cuckoo Danny now and she’s shedding right now it’s spring this is what it looks like you can see the fur crater where all her hair isn’t and then when a husky blows their coat in spring the hair just comes out and it’s so much I brush like a lot oh but you still get hair bombs everywhere it’s just what it is to have a husky and so that you can really see the difference in the in the fur this is nothing left here but like the guard hairs and then all this is that warm awesome double coat you can do Rosie good girl oh okay stop

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Siberian Husky Shedding (Blowing) Her Coat

Siberian Husky Coat Harvest

As you know from previous posts, our Siberian Husky Roxy is the family sheep.  We harvest her undercoat and use it to spin yarn and weave hats and scarves.  In case you haven’t seen what it is like when a Husky blows their coat, the video below will give you a taste of the experience.

 

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Siberian Husky Shedding (Blowing) Her Coat

Siberian Husky Coat Harvest

As you know from previous posts, our Siberian Husky Roxy is the family sheep.  We harvest her undercoat and use it to spin yarn and weave hats and scarves.  In case you haven’t seen what it is like when a Husky blows their coat, the video below will give you a taste of the experience.

 

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Edible Landscaping – Winter Garden Update

Winter Garden Happenings

Spring is coming, here is a quick edible landscaping update on our winter garden!

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(VIDEO) Spinning with the Babe’s Pinkie Spinning Wheel

Spinning is Old School

Spinning WheelSpinning with a spinning wheel originally dates back to around the 11th century.  Here at Suburban Stone Age, it dates back to last month.  After 120 agonizing days spinning with a drop spindle in 2010, I swore the next time I’d make yarn I’d be doing it with a spinning wheel.  Four years later, that has finally come true.  Meet my first spinning wheel; the Babe’s Pinkie Double Treadle wheel.

Fossil Fuel Free Fiber

Part about what I love so much about this wheel is that, aside from what it took to manufacture and ship it to me, it will never use fossil fuels again for make wondrous, homespun fiber.  This machine runs on butt fat, of which I have plenty, and I’m not afraid to get a workout to produce yarn for garments and gifts.

Dog? Sheep? Yes.

The true reason I got this wheel is because our Siberian Husky, Roxy, is our family sheep.  Every year, she explodes with fur as she sheds her winter undercoat.  This coat is a magical, mysterious thing of beauty and usefulness.  After a washing and carding, it becomes a marvelous yarn that make the most unique hats of all time. For me that closes the circle.  Girl feeds dog, dogs make clothes, girls wears clothes, and girl happily feeds the dog again.

Take It For A Spin

not it’s time to show you the Babe’s Pinkie Spinning Wheel itself, fresh out of the box and working away.  I hope you enjoy this old school piece of technology finding it’s way into our modern lives!

 

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(VIDEO) Edible Landscaping Tour at Suburban Stone Age

You asked for it, and here it is! Come along for a personal, first-time-ever video tour of Suburban Stone Age!

Apparently, I’m a talker, because this vid is almost 30 mins long. But if you have the attention span, I’ll share with you (in detail!) the edible landscaping as SSA and why we planted the way we did.

Enjoy!

 

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(VIDEO) How to Build a Fire with Flint and Steel

When camping for the weekend, I love to take the opportunity to practice survival skills.  This weekend I was testing out how to build a fire with flint and steel.  This technique dates back to the Iron Age, and is still incredibly effective today.  Find out how to use flint and steel, along with what works and what doesn’t.

 

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(VIDEO) Going Tropical in the Greenhouse

Let’s face it… a greenhouse in Southern California isn’t *really* necessary.

True, it’s great for starting seeds in the spring. But in summer it gets as hot as the surface of the sun, and in winter it stays only a few degrees above freezing. Because I don’t do a lot of container gardening, the greenhouse has been standing idle most of the year because the temperature extremes make it unlivable.

Today, I fixed that. Hating that valuable space was being wasted, I made some adjustments and rededicated the greenhouse to going tropical. I added shade cloth to cut down on the blasting heat, and brought electricity into the greenhouse so I could run an aquarium and a fan. The aquarium is for heat and humidity (I repurposed my son’s unused 12 gallon tank), and the fan is to keep the air circulating. By the end of the day, things were running smoothly and I must say it was quite nice in there.

My tropicals that have been overwintering inside will like it a lot, I feel. And now I have a new microclimate to explore, which opens up a whole new world of plants to play with. As the greenhouse evolves, I’ll keep you posted, but so far, it’s a winner!  
 

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California Tarantulas Are Looking For Love This Fall

california tarantula suburban stone age

The hubby saw this (big) little guy and jumped out of his chair saying “WHAT THE …?!?”

To explain, we have native California tarantulas, and in autumn, the males wander around looking for a hot date. This male somehow wandered into Suburban Stone Age and we found him stuck to the side of the house.

I am sorry to inform you Sir, but there are no tarantula women here for you today.

I put my little friend in a jar and am taking him to a luxurious tarantula resort, the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. There he can live in bliss and find the big, hairy woman of his dreams.

How to Help Tarantulas

If you see a tarantula on the move in your area, give them a break.  Instead of swatting them with a newspaper, quietly observe these gentle giants.  Chances are you aren’t what they are looking for, and will move along to find a mate elsewhere.  If you need immediate help, call a spider-friendly friend or neighbor to remove and relocate them for you.  Local wildlife centers may also have staff or volunteers who may be able to help you.

More Info on Tarantulas In California

If you would like to know more about the California tarantula, this video from Baynature.org is a great resource.

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